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Suzuki- Highly recommended Japanese traditional restaurant

There’s one Kaiseki restaurant I fell in love in Tokyo.
About Kaiseki ryori, please check it :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaiseki

I go to this restaurant every month for our treat, Here I can find best traditional dishes I ever had.
The restaurant is called “Suzuki” and it’s very tiny cozy restaurant near Shintomicho station, very close to Tsukiji or Ginza area.
There’s only one chef and he creates really beautiful and creative dishes based on Japanese tradition.
You will be amazed with the taste and can feel the season from the natural ingredients.
I was wondering if I write about this restaurant on my blog because there is a kind of hidden gem (too good!) but today I decided to share with you since I want you to try his dishes if you have chance to come to Japan.
The course is only one (Omakase) and everyday he serves different dishes based on the season.

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Suzuki
Address: 1-3-2, Tsukiji, Chuo, Tokyo

This is the web site, it is not official site though. Price is 8,500yen per person.
http://gm.gnavi.co.jp/shop/0120130137/
http://tabelog.com/tokyo/A1313/A131301/13119576/

東京都中央区築地1-3-2
18:00~21:30(L.O)
03-3543-1711
No Sun

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How to make Kuri no Shibukawani- Japanese chestnut glace recipe

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This week, I saw one of my best favorite thing at vegetable store- Chestnut (Kuri) :)!
I felt autumn is finally coming <3

I used chestnut for Kuri-Gohan (rice cooked with chestnut) first, and then I made Shibukawani yesterday.
It’s similar to Marron glace but the Japanese one is with inner skin still on. It’s natural look and a fantastic taste, you can also use it for making many kinds of sweets.
I made chestnut tart last week.

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It take time to make them from scratch but the taste is special!
You can find bottled Kuri-no-Shibukawani at market as well in Japan.

Ingredient:

750g of Chestnut (big pieces are better)
550g of granulated sugar
1 teaspoon of baking soda
1.5L water
1. Put the chestnut in a water and keep in a fridge for 1 day, after they are soaked well then it’s easier to peel the hardshell.

  1. With a sharp knife, cut a little hardshell and peel off with hand carefully (keep the inner skin on) After peel off, place in a water.
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3. Place plenty of water, baking soda, and chestnut in a pan and cook for 30 minutes with lower heat.

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  1. Drain the water and wash chestnut well.

  2.  Do (3) – (4) again for 3 times.

  3. Clean up the black surface of the chestnuts with finger (gently rubbing) and bamboo skewer.

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  1. Place the clean chestnuts in a clean water.

  2. Place sugar and 1.5L water in a pan and bring it boil. Then turn the heat to lower heat and place chestnut. Cook it for 1.5 hours with lower heat.

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  1. Turn off the heat and place a lid, leave it for overnight.

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  1. Remove all the chestnuts from the syrup and put saran wrap on top to prevent dry.

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  1. Boil the syrup again until it became half. Turn off the heat and return the chestnuts into it.
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Cooking in Tokyo with Mari

Thank you so much for joining to our class and posting warm article. I enjoyed talking with you about our culture and your experience very much. I am happy to see such a nice friend! Thank you again!